Skip to menu Skip to content

SPACE partners join to discuss Connected and Automated Mobility scenarios

Label
News
date
9 May 2019
On 6 February, SPACE partners gathered to discuss use cases of AVs integrated with public transport that have been identified in the SPACE project so far.

The use cases will provide a guide for practical use and will serve as an educational tool to build awareness and show future scenarios for all stakeholders involved.

During the workshop, the Working Group approved the final list of 13 use cases of AVs integrated with public transport. The list include a first/last mile feeder to a public transport station, a shared point-to-point service, a local bus service, and 10 other use cases. Because of the ongoing changes and technological developments in the industry, the list of use cases will constantly be updated and adapted over time. You can find the complete list of use cases in Chapter 1 (link) of the SPACE toolkit.

In addition to approving the use case list, SPACE partners also worked together to allocate each use case to a specific urban setting: urban (high density), suburban, small and isolated city, and rural (low density).

After lunch, Endre Angelvik (Ruter), Trude Flatheim (Ruter) and Marte Mariussen (Multiconsult) took the stage to talk about the steps that need to be taken to achieve the ultimate goal of transport planning: to create more liveable urban environments. The Working Group discussed the backcasting approach: a framework that is applied to a specific setting and provides a roadmap to achieve certain goals for this particular setting.

The afternoon ended with an interactive workshop in which two groups were created to reproduce two different scenarios: a dense urban setting (the Hamburg group) and a lower density regional setting (the Flanders group). Each group had to identify the useful steps of the previously discussed backcasting approach for their setting, and add any missing steps that might contribute to reach the goals of their specific setting.

We would like to thank all participants to the workshop for their attendance and contributions!

UITP

Featured News & Publications

View all updates

Lexicon

7 words explained

platooning

Also known as flocking. A collection of (automated) vehicles that travel together, actively coordinated in formation. Platoons decrease the distances between vehicles using electronic, and possibly mechanical, coupling. Platooning allows many vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously.

urban setting

High density environment with an efficient high capacity public transport system with good capillarity and high frequencies.

suburban setting

Medium density environment with a good public transport system with radial connections to the city center, but lower capillarity and frequencies. This setting includes suburban cities.

small cities

Small, isolated city with an own public transport system and <100K inhabitants.

rural

Low-density environment, small cities and villages with poor public transport services mainly connecting the villages.

SAE level

The SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) levels define the level of vehicle autonomy, or in other words, how much human intervention is still needed for an automated vehicle to operate. Currently, five SAE levels have been defined: Level 0: Automated system issues warnings and may momentarily intervene but has no sustained vehicle control. Level 1 (hands on): Driver and automatic system share vehicle control. The driver must be ready to retake full control at any time. Level 2 (hands off): The automated system takes full control of the vehicle (accelerating, braking, and steering). The driver must monitor the driving and be prepared to intervene immediately at any time if the automated system fails to respond properly. Level 3 (eyes off): The automated system takes full control of the vehicle (accelerating, braking, and steering). The driver must monitor the driving and be prepared to intervene immediately at any time if the automated system fails to respond properly. Level 4 (mind off): As level 3, but no driver attention is ever required for safety, e.g. the driver may safely go to sleep or leave the driver's seat. Level 5 (steering wheel optional): No human intervention is required at all. An example would be a robotic taxi.

V2X

Vehicle-to-everything (V2X) communication is the passing of information from a vehicle to any entity that may affect the vehicle, and vice versa.